Put on Your Own Oxygen Mask First

Put on Your Own Oxygen Mask First

Meeting professionals—planners in particular—are hardworking, often selfless people who put others first. It’s our role, isn’t it, to ensure all details of a program will go off without a hitch and to put in place a safety and security plan to protect those who attend the meetings and events we do? Alas, we often don’t do the same for ourselves.

I’ve had “that” bug on and off for five weeks. Even hearing from others that it is widespread and even those of us who got our flu shots are “getting it” is not making it easier to endure. I’m in round two, the more serious one, because I, like many who a) are self-employed and aren’t paid for time we aren’t working; b) are meeting professionals with deadlines often missed by others so we have to scramble to get things done; c) are invincible because how could we possibly be too sick to work … took too little time off.

It’s simple advice; I know you know it.

The question is do you follow your own and others’ advice to:

  1. Rest. Get plenty of it. You can skip social events, telling friends that you simply need to rest and will see them another day. Instead of staying up to watch one more episode of (fill in the blank) or respond to one more tweet or Instagram or other social media post, go to bed.

Consider what my very healthy aunt, who did yoga before it was “in,” did at work: insist that your work place have a quiet room that can be used for naps for those who need even 15 minutes to rejuvenate. More meetings and conventions are setting up quiet rooms for those who want to pray, for use by nursing mothers and for people who just need a time out and can’t get back to their guest rooms.

Offices can do better in helping to keep people well by scheduling breaks versus back-to-back meetings and allowing people to do what will keep them healthier in the long run.

  1. Stay hydrated. Drink lots of water (Mixed alcoholic drinks don’t count!). Especially when you are on-site and racing around or doing training and know there’s not time between sessions for bio breaks [insist on at least 15 minute breaks for the health of everyone!] or in back to back to back to back meetings, just say sorry … I need to hydrate and that means bio breaks. You’ll be considered heroic and everyone will thank you—they need the breaks too.
  2. Keep it clean. Keep antiseptic wipes handy and clean your keyboards—all of them—and your phone(s) and other devices. Germs stick around longer than we would like. Oh, and take those wipes with you on planes and trains and wipe down surfaces. So what if others look at you strangely. Better that than sick.
  3. See a doctor. Don’t delay. “It’s just a cold,” is what I said and treated it that way. Although I’ll never know if the flu shot and an earlier doctor visit would have kept this from getting worse, it couldn’t, as my late parents would have said, “hoit” to see a doctor!
  4. Stay away from others … except medical professionals …  because you need to stop spreading germs. It’s why schools close when multiple children and/or teachers are sick—they know that germs spread person to person and by staying home we can stop the spread more easily. This means that if you work in an office outside your home, call in sick. You may be well liked and appreciated; your germs are not.

This year’s bugs—respiratory and other—are making the rounds. Schools are closing because children and teachers are passing the viruses around. Those same schools are wiping down surfaces with disinfectant (I wonder if hotels and airlines do the same. Somehow I doubt it is nearly as thorough. I may become my mother—of blessed memory—and “Monk” and travel with even more disinfectants than before!).

Friends have provided all kinds of other advice, some of which includes whiskey (which I don’t drink), chicken soup (that was done via mail order*), and other home remedies. Most have said that rest and hydration and a visit to the doctor made a difference.

Flu shots? The verdict is out. My primary care doctor said the stats show this year’s vaccine was only 49% effective. Friends and I who got the shot and those who didn’t have had mixed results.

I don’t know that we’re the worst at taking care of ourselves, just that we are bad. We want to appear in control (!) and show that no one else can handle the intricacies of meetings. I thought I’d learned that lesson years ago but this time around, deadlines and “stuff” made me think that over-the-counter meds and a day or two in bed would make me all better! HA!

Although this is addressed to planners, it goes for you too, suppliers! You have quotas to meet and sales calls to make and lunches and dinners you’re required to attend. Maybe we should call “time out” and make the industry healthier by saying it’s OK to crawl into bed and get well and let those who set the quotas know that being healthy is far more important in the long run.

As for me, it’s a Saturday as I write this. I’m going back to bed and maybe tomorrow to the ER depending on what my doctor determines. That, meds, lots of water and rest, I hope will make this stop once and for all.

You? How are you putting on your own oxygen mask? What tried and true remedies have you found that you’ll share in the comments section.

Most of all, stay well!

*I received nothing for posting a link to Grandma’s Chicken Soup.

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